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Medieval London's 'global' fish trade

last modified Jun 05, 2014 04:07 PM
Analysis of cod bones has revealed the 13th-century origin of London's 'global' fish trade, when local fishing could no longer support its growing demands.

 

New research, carried out by Dr David Orton, formerly of the McDonald Institute and now at UCL Institute of Archaeology, Dr James Barrett of the McDonald Institute and colleagues, identifies a sudden change in London's food supply during the early 13th-century, indicating the onset of large-scale import trade with fish catches from as far away as Arctic Norway.

The research, published in the journal Antiquity, was funded jointly by the Leverhulme Trust and the Fishmonger's Company, one of London's ancient City Guilds.

For further information http://www.cam.ac.uk/research/news/cod-bones-reveal-13th-century-origin-of-londons-global-fish-trade

 

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