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Agriculture facilitated permanent human occupation of The Tibetan Plateau after 3600 BP

last modified Nov 21, 2014 11:17 AM
Martin Jones of the McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research publishes in Science with Chinese scholars to show how Agriculture facilitated permanent human occupation of the Tibetan Plateau after 3600 BP

 

Understanding of when and how humans adapted to living at altitudes above 2000 to 3000 metres of the Tibetan Plateau has been constrained by a paucity of archaeological data. The data sets in this research from the northeastern Tibetan Plateau indicate that the first villages were established only by 5200 years ago. Since 3600 calendar years before the present, a novel agropastoral economy facilitated year-round living at higher altitudes. This successful subsistence strategy facilitated the adaptation of farmers-herders to the challenges of global temperature decline during the late Holocene.

Other past McDonald Insititute Visiting Scholars involved in this research include Xinyi Liu, Guanghui Dong, Jimmy Zhao and Minmin Ma.

For more information http://www.sciencemag.org/content/early/recent

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